The Beatles‘ record label has moved to deny rumours that the band’s music is about to be made available online.

The legends are one of the last acts to license their back catalogue to online stores.

However, UK download site Wippit recently claimed it would be the first to sell the songs, posting a headline on its homepage.


This immediately prompted The Beatles’ record company EMI to issue a statement denying the link-up and asked that the download site removed its claims, reports BBC News.

The claim has since been removed, though Wippit have yet to comment.

Rumours that The Beatles’ back catalogue would be available for download soon have been rife lately.

A potential deal with iTunes was suggested last month after the band’s own label Apple Corps settled a long-running trademark dispute with Apple Inc, leading Apple Corps manager Neil Aspinall to say The Beatles looked forward to “many years of peaceful co- operation with the firm”.

This followed more talk in January when Apple boss Steve Jobs used a selection of music from the band’s classic ‘Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ album to demonstrate the musical properties of the new iPhone.

Source: NME.com

Starbucks and Concord Music Group have formed a new label, Hear Music, which will sign established and emerging artists directly for distribution inside and outside the coffee chain.

Under the collaborative venture, Starbucks will take primary responsibility for A&R, while Concord will lead marketing, promotion and distribution of Hear Music artists outside the cafes.


Hear Music expects to release its first album by the end of this year. Neither Starbucks nor Concord would confirm a New York Post report that Sir Paul McCartney is close to signing a deal.

Since 1999, the Hear Music brand has been used for compilations and co-releases for sale at Starbucks locations. The name will now be used exclusively for the Los Angeles-based Hear Music label partnership.

Source: Billboard.com

In a world of revolving trends, many musicians find themselves not able to keep up with what is hot on today’s music scene. Country songs cross over onto pop charts. Country songs become dance mixes. Hard rockers belt out a ballad now and then. Some acts find themselves on the receiving end of a sellout choke hold, until either giving in or giving up. Being rich and famous, as it’s been said, is not as glamorous as it seems. But in today’s Britney Spears-afide world of music, where the word “influences” often means nothing, bucking any system could cost an artist his or her career.

Punk unit, Burntside, doesn’t seem to care about trends. Members of the band are not shy about what they are into. With a new CD and some fresh dates, they’ve been busy doing what many before them have done: basking in the simple, yet complicated and misunderstood, world of punk.


Recorded in Rockford, the self-titled debut has plenty to offer. A four-song demo, the disc will surely whet any punk appetite. True to the genre, the first cut, “Bad Decisions,” is a strong example of why punk music has had so much staying power. Like the Ramones and Misfits, Burntside does not pride itself on drawn-out guitar solos that get so technical they scare off most listeners. The proof of punk’s power lies in the lyrics and the melodies, created nicely by this band.

Lyrically, Burntside captures the in-your-face, blue-collar world of fun, frustration and angst, without deep philosophical rock ‘n’ roll excursions. After all, this is punk, and Burntside does it well, proving it as Shawn Scarpetta belts out “I make bad decisions all the time. …” The band also pays homage to Glen Danzig and Misfits with a medley of “Martian” and “Vampira,” blending the two tunes into one song.

A true-to-form performer, Scarpetta delivers pure punk ranges, staying as far away from high notes as he needs to, driving home classic, monotone verses. The band’s only guitar player, the 34-year-old keeps it simple, yet powerful, showing off his true musicianship only when needed.

Bassist Rob Jackson and drummer Dan Marinelli make up the rhythm section battery that keeps up with Scarpetta nicely, locking in all three instruments into the driving melodies. Both Jackson and Marinelli don’t get tremendously fancy; however, the holes left at times by only one guitar are filled in well.

Although this disc hardly lacks quality, it is stripped down and raw, without juvenile lyrics, pubescent overtones and melodramatic theatrics, which may prompt fans of Blink 182, +44 or Green Day to pass. It’s pure punkā€”the way it was originated. The New York Dolls, Ramones, Misfits and Velvet Underground would be proud of this effort.


Jarvis Cocker has denied he is planning a Pulp reunion.

Despite being joined onstage by Pulp bassist Steve Mackay, auxiliary guitarist Richard Hawley and keyboard played Candida Doyle for a solo show in November, he admitted that he hadn’t considered a full-blown reunion.

When asked about it Cocker declared: “Hell would have to freeze over first! No, I don’t know. The members of the group are all in touch with each other and all friendly, there have been no deaths that I know of.

“So there is no barrier other than the fact that at the moment I can’t really see a point. If it was to seem like the right thing to do then there’s no reason why not, but I am certainly not planning it at the moment.”

Cocker also said he considered making a Pulp album before making his first solo album ‘Jarvis’, due to the fact former Pulp member Steve Mackey played on the album (and is also in Jarvis’ touring band) along with Richard Hawley, who was also briefly in the Sheffield band.

He said: “If I wanted to make a Pulp record, I would have made one. We talked about that before we did it and also we didn’t want to sound like one of his (Hawley’s) records, not because I don’t like his records, but because that wouldn’t do either one of us any favours.”

Cocker also considered his musical legacy, he told The Trip Wire: “I hated that term (Britpop) and never considered Pulp to be a part of that…I actually don’t think that much interesting music came out of Britpop really, maybe other people would disagree with me.”

Source: NME.com

The former Pulp frontman will release his first solo album, Jarvis, April 3 in North America via Rough Trade.

Download: Jarvis Cocker – “Don’t Let Him Waste Your Time”

Starbucks and Concord Music Group have formed a new label, Hear Music, which will sign established and emerging artists directly for distribution inside and outside the coffee chain.

Under the collaborative venture, Starbucks will take primary responsibility for A&R, while Concord will lead marketing, promotion and distribution of Hear Music artists outside the cafes.


Hear Music expects to release its first album by the end of this year. Neither Starbucks nor Concord would confirm a New York Post report that Sir Paul McCartney is close to signing a deal.

Since 1999, the Hear Music brand has been used for compilations and co-releases for sale at Starbucks locations. The name will now be used exclusively for the Los Angeles-based Hear Music label partnership.

Source: Billboard.com


Monday afternoon time killer: Dylan Hears a Who

7 Dr. Seuss songs done by Highway 60-era dylan (supposedly.) I’ll put $10 on the fact that this isn’t Dylan, but is sure is good. From the sound quality to the vocal inflections, it’s a fun way to kill time.

Could it be that commercial radio is looking to befriend the independent artist? Apparently, amidst all the format-switching and auto-programming, Clear Channel and their kin have perhaps realized they’re falling behind where satellite is booming: playing good music.

The American Association Of Independent Music (A2IM), an organization representing independent music in the marketplace, has reached an agreement with four of the major radio outlets (CBS, Citadel, Clear Channel and Entercom), that requires 8,400 half-hour blocks of airtime to be dedicated to independent music. The A2IM’s “Rules of Engagement” marks the first step in setting an even bar for independent music on commercial radio.

This comes on the heels of New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer’s attack on the questionable relationship between major labels and commercial radio, as well as a recent agreement whereby radio giants would pay the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) $12.5 million in an effort to curb long-standing questionable practices that have been characterized as modern-day payola.


A2IM sent a letter to the FCC urging them to define the parameters between the four major labels (Universal, EMI, Sony BMG and Warner) and commercial radio. After a series of meetings and exchanges between A2IM, the FCC and the radio groups, the three have agreed on the conditions, jumpstarting a independent music campaign that will be led by A2IM, as well as the Future Of Music Coalition (FMC) and American Federation Of Television And Radio Artists (AFTRA), among others.

“This is for the entire music industry, not just for us,” explains Peter Gordon, A2IM board member and president of indie label Thirsty Ear. “It has been a fairly murky area for a number of years and without certainty, it can lend itself for certain individuals to take advantage of it. All we’ve done is create a foundation for a proper business relationship. What [independent labels] have is just as valid and just as exciting as everything else [commercial radio] is playing. And surprise surprise, we might even have better stuff.”

The “Rules Of Engagement” consist of eight guidelines, one of which forbids all cash and non-cash consideration made my labels to be reported to the FCC, who could not be reached by press time.

Source: cmj.com